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Cotlands 85 year journey

Cotlands has been serving South African children and their families for the past 85 years

  • Covid-19 pandemic resulted in the temporary closure from March to August
  • QCTO Level 4 ECD Practitioner qualification accredited
  • New Venture Creation Toy Library Skills course is accredited with the Services Seta
  • The first cohort of 65 learners enrolled on CotlandsIgnite™
  • Cotlands head office team transformed into remote working permanently
  • Closure of playgroups in Western Cape, Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal
  • Launched three toy library trailers linked to mobile health clinics in Ixopo, Umfolozi and eDumbe in KwaZulu-Natal
  • Hosted the 15th International Toy Library Conference at IIE MSA South Africa
  • Closure of Olievenhoutbosch toy library depot
  • Developed procedures and processes for the projects unit
  • Set up a training unit focused on providing online training courses
  • Launched toy library trailers linked to mobile health clinics
  • Reviewed Cotlands’ constitution and board mandates
  • Online training era
  • Cotlands’ head office and Gauteng region moved to new premises
  • Launched four online PLAY courses, with partners UNICEF, LEGO and DBE
  • External evaluation using Early Learning Outcomes Measure to determine impact
  • Appointed as regional franchisee for SmartStart in North West
  • Expanded early learning playgroups to Barberton in Mpumalanga
  • Set up a toy library depot in Barberton in Mpumalanga
  • Initiated early learning playgroup pilot in partnership with Ilifa Labantwana & Department of Social Development in North West
  • Launched our first mobile toy library in Mpumalanga
  • Closure of residential baby units in Gauteng and Western Cape
  • Early learning playgroup model for new-borns to four-year-olds launched in May
  • Cotlands launched its first two mobile toy libraries in Gauteng and one in KZN
  • A toy library depot was launched in Lydenburg in Mpumalanga in 2014
  • Selected as a partner by Ilifa Labantwana to participate in think-tank
  • Cotlands initiated the first Southern Africa play conference
  • Non-centre based: Toy libraries and early learning playgroup era
  • Launched Turffontein toy library in collaboration with Save the Children UK
  • All regions adopted the integrated model
  • In December, Cotlands announced the transformation of the Aids Hospice into the Cotlands Child Care unit due to the drastic reduction in Aids-related deaths
  • ECD centre opened at the Macassar Haven community centre in Macassar in the Western Cape
  • Toy library depot established in Macassar in the Western Cape
  • Macassar Haven became a community centre
  • Opened Cotlands toy libraries in East London in the Eastern Cape and Soweto in Gauteng
  • Opened Tirelong ECD centre in Rustenburg in North West
  • Acquired property in Reeston in the Eastern Cape
  • The first toy library started in Hlabisa in KwaZulu-Natal
  • Opened the Cotlands community centre in Soweto in Gauteng
  • Cotlands celebrates 70 years
  • Opened Everest ECD centre near Boschfontein in Mpumalanga
  • Opened Cotlands House in Turffontein in Gauteng
  • Acquired Macassar Haven in Macassar in the Western Cape
  • Opened Cotlands’ nutrition project in East London in the Eastern Cape
  • Implemented antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive children
  • Opened the second Cotlands hospice in Somerset West in the Western Cape
  • Launched Cotlands/Chris Hani Baragwanath HIV/Aids counselling project
  • Home-based care services for HIV babies were offered in Soweto in Gauteng and Hlabisa in KwaZulu-Natal
  • Initiated community outreach programmes
  • Formulated policy guidelines for children infected/affected by HIV/Aids
  • Paediatric HIV/Aids community care and hospice era
    Cotlands was the first organisation in South Africa to open a paediatric hospice providing end-stage care for children with Aids.
  • The Aids hospice at Cotlands opened – the first in South Africa
  • The Cotlands nursery school opened in Turffontein in Gauteng
  • Some residential children were diagnosed with HIV
  • The sanctuary in Turffontein in Gauteng was opened
  • The home moved to larger premises in Kenilworth.
  • Strict vetting procedures were instituted for prospective adoptive parents, due to a national shortage of babies
  • Public health department requested that Matron Reece make alterations to the home
  • Due to financial constraints, Matron Reece decided to close the home
  • After an appeal by the Sunday Times, Matron Reece raised £4000, and the home registered as a charitable institution
  • Established by Matron Dorothy Reece, a US missionary nursing sister, after finding an abandoned baby on her doorstep